Not Science

Jun 04

The Transit of Venus: June 6th

Just a small reminder for people. The Transit of Venus (a twice in a lifetime event that will not happen again until after your are dead), is on the 5th and 6th this week on Wednesday. If you are anywhere in America, you will see it at sunset on the 5th. You can either view it live (and kill your eyes), you can fashion eye protection, or you can view the transit here.

Remember to suggest future experiments, show us a cool article, or just ask a question by using the “Add to the madness!” button in the sidebar. Also remember to follow us so you don’t miss any future posts. 

-Edison

Ocean Currents

The East Australian Current. We all know what this is because of Finding Nemo. I don’t feel right using that as a reference. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a great movie, but it’s an admission of ignorance to only know what an underwater current is because of a children’s film. I’ve gotten off topic.

An ocean current (like the EAC sigh) is a current (insert Nicholas Cage), directed by any of a few things. Breaking waves, wind, Coriolis effectcabbeling, temperature, and salinity (saltiness. Actually, I’m not sure if that’s accurate). (This was all taken from Wikipedia)

It’s not uncommon for an ocean current to suck divers down, or push them up. It’s also possible for these currents to drown the divers. Practice safe diving… practices.

Building on my limited knowledge, let’s keep talking about the EAC.

The EAC is warm water being pushed from the Coral Sea where it will split from the South Equatorial Current all the way down the east coast of Australia. This current is typically 2-3 knots (2.302-3.453 mph) in speed, but can reach up to 7 knots (8.057 mph) in speed. It is used by tropical marine animals as transport to sub-tropical habitats near the south-east coast of Australia.

The more I write, the stupider I feel. Remember to suggest future experiments, show us a cool article, or just ask a question by using the “Add to the madness!” button in the sidebar. Also remember to follow us so you don’t miss any future posts. 

-Edison

Jun 03

How the Hell does a Bubble Work?

I got pretty curious while in the shower one day and decided to find out what the science behind a bubble is. 

I was shocked to find out that a bubble’s film is made of three layers - A layer of water between two layers of soap. The soap’s hydrophilic (attracted to water) molecules face that layer of water, while the hydrophobic (repelled by water) molecules face away from the layer of water. These molecules will automatically take the shape of a sphere since it requires the least amount of energy to create. 

As for the chemical composition of typical bubbles, my laziness is making me quote directly from a nice article:

Bubble Solutions

Though soap bubbles are traditionally made from (you guessed it) soap, most bubble solutions consist of detergent in water. Glycerin often is added as an ingredient. Detergents form bubbles in much the same way as soap, but detergents will form bubbles even in tap water, which contains ions that could prevent soap bubble formation. Soap contains a carboxylate group that reacts with calcium and magnesium ions, while detergents lack that functional group. Glycerin, C3H5(OH)3, extends the life of a bubble by forming weaking hydrogen bonds with water, slowing down its evaporation.

                                                                               -Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D

As for the physics of a bubble, I don’t think I need an article for my information. Brace yourselves; This will not be impressive:

Since a bubble is filled with air (oxygen, carbon dioxide, methane), it kinda floats.

Remember to suggest future experiments, show us a cool article, or just ask a question by using the “Add to the madness!” button in the sidebar. Also remember to follow us so you don’t miss any future posts. 

-Edison

May 24

Typical Reactions when Information is Withheld

The premise for this experiment is simple:

How do people react when information is withheld from them?

The background:

This experiment comes from prepping for an experiment that I didn’t follow through with. When telling my friends that I was going to use them in an experiment, but refused to give them any information about it, they usually got nosy and were desperate to know what was going on. Needless to say, I had fun with this. I thought it might be more fun to try this with people I don’t know.

The experiment:

I will go to a public place (the mall, a concert, etc) and approach strangers. I will then ask them if I can include them in an experiment. When/if they say yes, then/if they ask what it is, I will only stare at them for five seconds, write down my initial observations of their reaction, then walk away without a word. As I walk away, I will observe their final reactions and write them down when not in sight. 

This will be done to twenty people. I’ll try to get at least two per day (I’m not always at the mall or at concerts), and will post updates in sets of five at the closest 12:00 am/pm. 

I’m really excited for this experiment. Remember to suggest future experiments, show us a cool article, or just ask a question by using the “Add to the madness!” button in the sidebar. Also remember to follow us so you don’t miss any future posts. 

-Edison

May 22

Things to Come

Hey guys. I’ve been feeling a bit lazy this past week - more than usual - so I haven’t written anything. I also have nothing in the queue to fall back on.

However, I’ve got an idea for an experiment to start this week, and another to do at a later date. I’ll add the second one to the “Future” page (found in the sidebar), but the first one will have to remain a secret. I won’t be posting any updates of the current experiment until it’s done so the results don’t change. It’ll be the first experiment to include other people! Let’s be excited. 

Remember to suggest future experiments, show me a cool article, or just ask a question by using the “Add to the madness!” button in the sidebar. Also remember to follow us so you don’t miss any future posts. Things are going to start getting exciting!

I also edited the Mountain Story from the sleep deprivation experiment to make it more readable. You can find it here.

-Edison